Installations with heat pumps in commercial buildings

Heat pumps are used not only in residential buildings.They are more and more often found in commercial investments: in schools, office buildings, warehouse halls, hotels or religious buildings, also in Lesser Poland.

We encourage you to familiarize yourself with the case of the system installed in the “Biawena” sanatorium and healing building in Wysowa Zdrój (Lesser Poland Voivodeship).A heat substation with a total power of 600 kW was built in the facility, which consists of four ground-source heat pumps with a capacity of 60 kW each and eighteen air heat pumps with a capacity of 20 kW each.Air pumps operate in two cascades, which are additionally supplemented with a peak heat source, which are pre-existing oil boilers.Since the town is a health resort with natural healing springs, no permission for vertical drilling has been obtained.Therefore, it was decided to use a horizontal exchanger with a total length of 5000 meters, which is supported by heat from solar collectors and waste heat from sanitary sewage.Devices selected in this way provide heat for heating a 9,000 sq m facility.and produce domestic hot water.

You can find the whole article with examples from other provinces tutaj

Commercial property managers are increasingly pursuing two main objectives when choosing a heating system: very low heating costs and the environmental protection. That is why they decide to invest in heat pumps. The fact that modern heat pumps are virtually maintenance-free and can be managed remotely is also important when choosing this equipment. The pumps also provide the possibility of monitoring and service diagnostics via the Internet or smartphone. The advantages of heat pumps also include their long lifetime, which by many manufacturers is declared to be 20-25 years, as well as their small size and low noise level.

One of the examples of using heat pumps in a commercial facility is the system installed in the Children’s Academy “Ksawcio and Wojtuś” in Grodzisk Mazowiecki (Mazowieckie Province). The system is powered by two ground heat pumps with a power of 60 kW working in a cascade system. The lower power source of the system consists of vertical collectors with a total length of 2250 meters. These pumps, apart from supplying underfloor heating and radiator heating (the heated area is 1750 sq. m.), prepare also domestic hot water.

A similar system was also installed in 2013 in Zalesie Śląskie (Opolskie Province) as part of the thermomodernisation of the primary school building (facility from 1965). Renewable energy sources replaced two obsolete coal-fired boilers with a total power of 240 kW. Heat pumps operate in a cascade system that has a heating power of up to 120 kW. The lower heat source is vertical collectors with a total length of 2800 meters. The heating system supplies radiator heating of the entire building with a volume of 5466 cubic metres. It provides a temperature of +21°C inside the building. In addition, the pump system generates domestic hot water to supply the kindergarten, also located in the building.

The domestic hot water is stored in a 500-litre tank. In summer, a separate system for hater heating is used (consisting of 5 solar collectors, with an area of 1.818 sq. m. each). The heat pump system is monitored through a module that presents operating parameters such as: temperature of the heat pump lower source inlet and outlet, outdoor temperature, indoor temperature in the facility, domestic hot water temperature and COP (coefficient of performance). On the basis of these data, a visualization of the heating system operation was developed, which is used also for educational purposes.

Another interesting project executed under the thermomodernisation is the system installed in the sanatorium and recovery centre “Biawena” in Wysowa Zdrój (Małopolskie Province). In the centre, a heat distribution substation with a total power of 600 kW has been built, consisting of four ground heat pumps with a power of 60 kW each and eighteen air heat pumps with a power of 20 kW each. The air pumps operate in two cascades, which are additionally complemented by an upper source of heat, which are the existing oil boilers. Since the town is a health resort with natural healing water springs, the approval for vertical boreholes has not been obtained. Therefore, the investor decided to install a horizontal exchanger with a total length of 5000 meters, which is supported by heat from solar collectors and waste heat from sanitary sewage. The equipment selected in this way provides heat to a 9000 sq. m. facility and produces domestic hot water.

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